Manhattan Loft, Harlequin London Trendsetter

It’s rare for me to focus on a style rather than a single product but I do enjoy the challenge when asked how to pull all of these products together.

Harlequin London have invited bloggers to do just that, which led me to look into the styles of Manhattan’s loft apartments and the 120 brands which Harlequin London represent. After looking through the collections I noticed that most styles are classical rather than contemporary or modern. Not always the case, so discovering a few brands which had distinct collections with modern styles was inspiring. Brands such as Lobmeyr, WMF, Saint Louis, Puiforcat (don’t ask me how to pronounce that), Kosta Boda and Christofle were all great companies who tick lots of boxes for me.

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Row 1: Powder Box by Puiforcat / Coffee pot, Art Déco 1937 by Puiforcat / Sugar Dandy XL clear glass by Kosta Boda
Row 2: Initiales dinnerware by Puiforcat / Matrice Table Lamp by Saint Louis / Athens Spiral chandelier by Stefan Rath for Lobmeyr
Row 3: Max and Moritz salf and pepper shakers by Wilhelm Wagenfeld for WMF / Sous le Soleil dinnerware by Porcelaine Legle / Champagne cooler by Martin Szekely for Christofle

 

I focused in on the styles that define Manhattan in the early twentieth Century, Art Déco. This was a time when the Chrysler Building was built, the world’s tallest building for 11 months before it was surpassed by the Empire State Building in 1931. I love that New York beat it’s own record.

“Art Déco in France found its American equivalent in the design of the New York skyscrapers of the 1920s. The Chrysler Building … was one of the most accomplished essays in the style.” John Julius Norwich, in The World Atlas of Architecture

This was a time when ‘new’ and ‘modern’ were exciting, leaving behind the designs which older generations had created.

You can see the inspiration board on Pinterest for this style below…

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Daniel

Having worked in design for the past decade, Daniel started ateliertally.com as a discussion of timeless, modernist product design. Trained as a graphic designer, he also has an avid interest in typography. You can follow him on Twitter @ateliertally.

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