How to tie a bow tie by The Hill-Side

I love bow-ties. I don’t ever feel fully comfortable wearing them but I love the look of that little piece of cloth around the neck. According to Wikipedia, bow-ties tend to be associated with particular professions, such as architects, tax-collectors, attorneys, university professors, teachers, waiters and politicians. Pediatricians frequently wear bow ties since infants cannot grab them the way they could grab a four-in-hand necktie, and they do not get into places where they would be soiled or could, whether accidentally or deliberately, strangle the wearer. I don’t fit in to any of the above but thankfully the wearing of bow-ties is a little more acceptable with less professional people.


“To its devotees the bow tie suggests iconoclasm of an Old World sort, a fusty adherence to a contrarian point of view. The bow tie hints at intellectualism, real or feigned, and sometimes suggests technical acumen, perhaps because it is so hard to tie. Bow ties are worn by magicians, country doctors, lawyers and professors and by people hoping to look like the above. But perhaps most of all, wearing a bow tie is a way of broadcasting an aggressive lack of concern for what other people think.”

Warren St John, The New York Times

For many, including me, tying a bow tie is like summiting the sartorial mountain top. To give you, and I, a refresher the Hill-Side have put together a clever clip using stop-motion. One natty chambray bow tie walks you through every step to ensure you’ll never think of the words “clip-on” again.

Richard Meier x Massimo Vignelli

Illustrious modernist Richard Meier and multi-disciplinary creator Massimo Vignelli reflect on their respective crafts, city life, and enduring friendship in this mesmeric film by Johnnie Shand Kydd. Shot at the minimalist offices of Richard Meier & Partners on 10th Avenue and West 36th Street, the two powerhouses discuss their collaboration on the firm’s forthcoming monograph, Richard Meier, Architect Volume 6, chronicling the stark, white, rationalist buildings that define the firm’s aesthetic.

The Pritzker Prize laureate’s most notable projects include the Getty Center in L.A., the Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art, and more recently, the two glass-and-steel towers on Perry Street in New York’s West Village that Martha Stewart, Ian Schrager, Calvin Klein, and Nicole Kidman have all called home. Vignelli, too, has left a significant mark on Manhattan, having famously designed the New York subway map and signage, in addition to working on everything from packaging and furniture design to corporate identities for clients like BMW, Barney’s, Xerox and American Airlines.

“Architects need to have a certain arrogance, a sense of self-belief,” posits Shand Kydd. “A designer, however, has to be more collaborative. Consequently, Meier and Vignelli have very different natures, but like all very talented people, they both look forward and not back.” Here Meier nonetheless looks to his present city, and beyond, to reveal his select few architectural necessities.

Richard Meier x Massimo Vignelli, On the Edge of Modernism With the Master Architect and the Genius Designer at

Lernert & Sander with Brioni

I posted videos by Lernert & Sander a couple of years ago so when I saw this video, commissioned by Wallpaper* magazine I was instantly hooked.

Dutch artists Lernert & Sander’s idea for this stills and video series for Wallpaper* Handmade 2012, shown in a specially-designed outdoor cinema at Brioni HQ in April 2012, arose naturally from the marriage of Brioni’s bespoke craftsmanship and Wallpaper’s Handmade theme.

‘We like to be playful and have fun, so there is an element 
of mischief about this film,’ they say. ‘What better way to showcase the abilities of Brioni’s master tailors than to set them the ultimate test of skill with a particularly exacting customer?’.






Fiat 500 by Gucci

Originally launched in 1957, the latest iteration of the doe-eyed classic Fiat 500 has been specially customised by Gucci’s Creative Director Frida Giannini, who enhanced the Fiat 500’s distinguishing traits and added the fashion house’s signature detailing via a signature red-green web down the side and the unmistakable “Guccissima” leather print on the seats.

Invited alongside visionaries such as Italian Vogue’s Franco Sozzani and Purple’s Olivier Zahm to dream up a film celebrating the partnership between the Italian automaker and fashion house, Director Chris Sweeney created a giant plastic model kit of the Fiat 500 by Gucci like the ones he used to make as children. “It’s an extreme, austere fashion version of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory or Wallace and Gromit, which are very playful, silly, colorful and magic,” explains Sweeney of his film.

fiat 500 gucci